Opinion: Jaguar has already shown it’s serious about electric

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    This is the XJ-based Limo Green, driven by an electric motor backed up by a Lotus-designed 1.2-litre engine

If an all-EV Jaguar line-up sounds unlikely, then step back and take a look at the brand’s recent product launches, which show it has been surprisingly committed to battery propulsion.

Back in 2009, Jaguar built the XJ-based Limo Green, which was driven by an electric motor and had a small battery backed up by a Lotus-designed 1.2-litre engine that acted as a generator when the battery was exhausted.

More recently, the first Jaguar I-Type Formula E electric race car was unveiled in 2016, with the team unusually run out of its car factory. A third-generation version has just been revealed ahead of the 2018/19 season, and the company has also committed to a one-make eTrophy I-Pace support series.

Even earlier, there was the stillborn C-X75 hybrid two-seat sports car, which was originally conceived with tiny jet turbine power generators. Five working prototypes were built with a more conventional battery hybrid setup, with motors that would go on to influence the I-Pace.

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The brand has also spent serious time and money designing an electric drivetrain for retrofitting into a classic E-Type. The E-Type Zero is on sale now via the company’s Classic division.

Finally, the I-Pace electric crossover beat the German premium brands to the market by some distance. Not only has the car been rapturously received but it has finally broken the historic — and arguably dated — Jaguar style mould, inside and out.

The I-Pace points to a sustainable future for this much-loved brand that has never quite hit the big time.

Read more

50 years of the Jaguar XJ

JLR to shut Solihull plant for two weeks as sales slide

2018 Jaguar I-Pace: 395bhp EV revealed

fadyady

soldi

i-Pace is not selling

The biggest problem is that i-Pace is not selling. 

And you can discount all the other initiatives; they were just one or two units at unsustainable cost and price.

And no point beating the Germans to market if they ultimately come with better product (which they have)

As such, Jaguar only has a track record of disaster or under achievement with EVs. 

To then bet the farm on EVs looks foolhardy. 

However the reality is that JLR doesn’t have much choice. The Ingenium engine is sh*t and there’s an over-reliance on diesel or V8s sourced from Ford.

The Dr

Statements without facts

Hilarious, do you work for Audi or Mercedes? Your pronouncements that the Germans EVs are better is without any evidence, they haven’t even come out yet???? Added to this the Jaguar is better looking, has 20% more range, and faster. Also how do you know the I-pace it isn’t selling, have you hacked into Jaguars computers? 

jonboy4969

SOLDI – go away, you talk

SOLDI – go away, you talk utter rubbish, as usual, the i-pace is outselling all expectations, the lead time for an order can be as long as 9-12 months, and as the car has ONLY JUST BEEN RELEASED you have a moronic bias against JLR, why i have no idea, perhaps they wont sell you a car because they wont sell to morons, and as for the Ingenium engine comment, LOL, you are so funny, you have no idea, none at all, which is why no one takes any notice of you at all – and a totla shame that you have not been banned from the site – it would be so much better without your constant moaning.

 

Aussierob

Good luck to them, I say.

And I’m not being sarcastic.

They’ve been searching for a USP ever since the pipe and slippers brigade died out. Traditional radiator grilles, walnut dashboards and soft leather trim had their day and so did Jaguar.

Lately, they been associated with unreliability, uncompetitive chassis and body design and dodgy engines.

Going all electric is a great decision and they should firmly and quickly commit to it. Purpose built BEV’s are so much better than cars designed and compromised for combustion as well as e – power.

Robbo

Aussie Rob – a view from down under

hackjo

They had a template with the

They had a template with the C-XF concept – rakish, feline lines in an ultra-modern design with a “cool Britannia” interior made up of iconic, modern styling finished in quality leather, wood and metal (plus decent plastics and carpets) and offering the kind of suave, funky style that you could imagine James Bond going for.

THAT was the way to keep the Jaguar DNA and move away from retro. Instead, they did 70% of the job with the original XF, which was a great starting point, but then gave up on that altogether and chucked the baby out with the bathwater with the XE and everything that followed.

They need to revisit that C-XF concept and come up with a range of saloons and coupes with those values available in EV and Hybrid powertrains, competitively priced. Ignore the SUV’s – that’s a fad which will die out within a few years.

They should be leading the market, not following it, which is what got them into this mess in the first place.

 

stavers

Wrong Picture….

Sorry – hard to take this seriously when you state the picture is the XJ Limo Green when it quite clearly says on the side of the car “XJ_e”.  The XJ_e project was to take a V8 N/A XJ, maintain the performance but reduce the CO2 by 75% – by fitting a 2.0L turbo GDI engine from the Evoque and a PHEV powertrain.

typos1

You do write some cr*p

You do write some cr*p sometimes Hilton – “the I-Pace electric crossover . . . has finally broken the historic — and arguably dated — Jaguar style mould, inside and out.”

– the “dated Jaguar style mould” was broken back in 2008 with the XF and every Jaguar since has looked like it comes from some Chinese start up, not a company which 100 years odd of history. Jaguars havent looked old since then, theyve looked modern, bland, charcterless and derivative but modern.

XXXX just went POP.

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