Jaguar Land Rover sales boss: Budget diesel taxation “counterintuitive”

Cars
33
0

Home

  • Jaguar XE

    Jaguar’s 2.0-litre diesel XE will be one of many cars affected by the taxation change

Rachel Burgess

The extra tax on buyers of new diesel cars imposed in the recent Budget is “counterintuitive”, according to Jaguar Land Rover sales boss Andy Goss.

From 1 April 2018, taxation for any new diesel car will increase by a tax band for the first year, unless that vehicle can meet new real-world testing standards, called RDE Step 2. However, these standards will not be introduced until 2020, meaning no new diesel model can yet be eligible for this exemption.

The diesel tax supplement for company cars is also rising from 3% to 4%.

Goss said: “We were surprised by the Budget. What is the rationale? It’s difficult to fathom what led to that [decision].

“If it had been a question of getting older diesel cars off the road, that would have been understandable. But to go for new diesels in the way they have is a real surprise.”

He also warned on the effect it would have on emissions: “It’s not good. CO2 will go the other way”, he cautioned, outlining that CO2 emissions will rise as people are pushed towards buying petrol cars which, on average, have higher CO2 emissions.

Goss’s comments echo that of the UK’s Society of Motor Manufacturers Traders (SMMT) boss Mike Hawes. In reaction to the Budget last month, Hawes said: “This budget will also do nothing to remove the oldest, most polluting vehicles from our roads in the coming years.”

The SMMT has also raised concerns about rising CO2 emissions, which will make it increasingly difficult for the UK to meet strict emissions targets.

Read more

Autumn Budget round-up

Opinion: Why the new diesel tax rules are a farce

Opinion: Singling out diesel is a facile solution to a complex problem

 

Our Verdict

Jaguar F-Pace 2.0d R-Sport

Jaguar takes a typically sporting approach to its F-Pace but it isn’t enough to better its sibling – the Land Rover Discovery Sport – as of yet

k12479

“What is the rationale? It’s

“What is the rationale? It’s difficult to fathom what led to that [decision]”

Today we have two articles, quoting the same ‘sales boss’. One admitting they got the pricing of the Velar wrong and are having to discount a brand new car, the other questioning the rationale and decision of others. Er…if you can’t get your own job right, what crediblity do you have in ‘fathoming’ others decisions?

max1e6

Self interest

If Jaguar was really concerned about air pollution and CO2 emissions then it would significantly reduce the weight of its car models.

Jaguar is complaining because they have invested in diesel engines and the taxes will make their products less attractive.

Spanner

But he is right, and the smmt

weirdly I agree with them. I can’t stand the smmt normally.

This does nothing to get the disgusting stink boxes off the road. The crap heap vans belching black smoke, crappo minicabs or the badly tuned smoky Mitsubishi I was following the other day. Penalises the cleanest, and does nothing to remove the millions of dung pile diesels out there which are doing the real damage to our lungs. 

Once the old cars are sorted deal with the new ones. Not the other way around.

Corny

Cobnapint

Goss is right

The budget penalises the cleanest diesels ever made, leaves the old smokers untouched and tries to direct customers over to vehicles that produce more CO2. Madness.

Diesel is here to stay. You cannot get the same torque characteristics or economy with a petrol engine that’s enough to shift a lorry or bus without needing a fuel tank the size of your local swimming pool. End of. 

k12479

Cobnapint wrote:

You cannot get the same torque characteristics or economy with a petrol engine that’s enough to shift a lorry or bus…

No, but what you can do is make vehicles lighter and less bloated, you know, make use of that lightweight aluminium technology we’ve heard so much of, so that vehicles don’t have borderline acceptable fuel consumption when powered by diesel that becomes horrendous when powered by petrol.

Cobnapint

Yeah but….

You cannot get the same torque characteristics or economy with a petrol engine that’s enough to shift a lorry or bus…

No, but what you can do is make vehicles lighter and less bloated, you know, make use of that lightweight aluminium technology we’ve heard so much of, so that vehicles don’t have borderline acceptable fuel consumption when powered by diesel that becomes horrendous when powered by petrol.

Lorries and buses are already made as light as possible. You can only go so far before they lose their rigidity and therefore capability and safety.

Even If you went and made the tractor unit the same weight as a Ford Fiesta, it’s still got to have the traction, power and braking capabilities to deal with a whacking great trailer full of produce.

fadyady

scrap

Diesel sales boomed on the

Diesel sales boomed on the back of perverse tax incentives. We now know that official emissions figures can’t be trusted and diesel pollution is causing huge problems. Makes complete sense to remove these perverse incentives and make diesel a minority choice again. People who really need a pick up, SUV or real high mileage vehicle will still choose one. But hopefully the overall market will become more rational.

angtennant

Will this really impact sales?

Given that the vast majority of diesel sales are vehicles in the tax bands 130 gr/km, the one off increase of £20 is irrelevant. Why will this impact sales?

The Govt message is anti diesel but it wont be a financial decison for the consumer.

Pages

Driven this week

  • Ford Mondeo ST-Line

  • Audi RS4 Avant

  • Subaru XV

  • Mini Cooper S Works 210

  • Seat Ibiza

Haymarket Logo

Facebook Comments

Comments are closed.